For every three patrons I get on Patreon, I’ll back another artist (for at least six months). Last week, I hit my first goal and got to back another artist! It was time to pay it forward on Patreon, but who to pick?

I decided to back Michigan comic artist and cool dad, Jason Strutz. Jason does great work, be it The Cask of Amontillado and The House of Montresor graphic novels or deciding to draw a different xenomorph for every letter of the alphabet.

If Jason’s name sounds familiar to regular Clattertron readers, it’s because he’s been a cohort at comic shows over the years. He even had a guest spot in an old comic. Jason and his family moved to Grand Rapids this past year and I miss his beardy face.

Check out Jason’s Patreon and considering throwing a buck or twenty his way.

Good news! Another kind soul became a patron yesterday, which means I only need two more patrons before I can pay it forward to a second artist. I don’t know who the second artist will be yet, but I know it will be a woman. I want to try to alternate between male and female artists.

ANYWAY

Thanks to my patrons for supporting me, and making it possible for me to support another artist.

Why should you become a patron?

Well, for starters you help support my comic making, and other artists if I get enough patrons.

You also get rewards!

At the lowest level, only $1 a month, you get full access to my patrons only blog posts. This includes my weekly behind the scenes posts. These posts include a scan of my original drawing for that week’s comic. Higher levels also include blog access, but with the added perks of reading my next Foxes & Boxes comic early and at the $5, $10, and $20 levels I send you original art each month! Note: the original art rewards are limited.

Plus, unlike algorithm-ruled social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram), patrons see all of my posts in their feeds (and get email updates). That’s right: even if you Like the Clattertron or Foxes & Boxes pages on Facebook, you won’t always see their updates in your feed. It’s true! Facebook makes money by forcing page owners (like me) to pay for their posts (called “boosting”) to be seen by more fans.

If you think it’s crappy you don’t get to see updates for a page you opted-in to following, well you are correct. It certainly is crappy, especially for creators like me. 

So! Skip Facebook and join me on Patreon instead.

clattertron patreon page

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Daniel J. Hogan is a geeky cartoonist and writer living in Michigan. Daniel is available for freelance writing and cartooning commissions (Contact Daniel). This post contains affiliate links, unless it doesn't.

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